We use cookies to improve your experience on this website. Read More Allow Cookies
+

More photographs from the series can be viewed here.

The following is the schedule of seminars and workshops for our 2019/20 winter programme 

 

Date

Title & Descriptor

Monday,

6th January 2020

Work Placement - An Innovative Approach to Developing & Enhancing Core Practitioner Competencies

 

Presented By

  • Dr Sandra Lenihan, Lecturer & Academic Placement Supervisor - Process, Energy & Transport Engineering, CIT
  • Dr Roisin Foley, Lecturer & Academic Placement Supervisor- Process, Energy & Transport Engineering, CIT
  • Noel Duffy, Lecturer & Course Co-ordinator Chemical & Biopharmaceutical Engineering, - Process, Energy & Transport Engineering, CIT
  • Cliona Hatano. AnSEO – The Student Engagement Office, CIT
  • CIT Chemical and Biopharmaceutical Engineering Graduates - Classes 2018 and 2019

Description

Work placement is, at this stage, a mandatory element of many programmes within CIT and as such poses many challenges for those involved in the process, i.e. staff, students and potential employers.

Since 1983, CIT’s Department of Process Energy and Transport Engineering has been offering the B. Eng. in Chemical & Biopharmaceutical Engineering, a full-time programme delivered over four academic years producing approximately 25 graduates annually, but in recent years this has increased to over 30.

This programme predominately covers core chemical engineering and specific needs of the pharmaceutical and biotechnology sectors but continues to ensure that graduates will meet the needs of traditional chemical industries, be equipped to travel globally and are able to guide the pharma sector as it transitions from traditional batch operation to continuous operation.The philosophy of the programme is to produce broadly educated, professional engineers, who have gained a thorough grounding in fundamentals, an understanding of the state of the art, a keen sense of application, an awareness of the impact on society of their decisions, and an ability to develop as new technologies emerge and as they encounter new problems and opportunities.

This programme is subject to internal re-approval every 5 years, involving external experts and is externally accredited by professional bodies such as Engineers Ireland, nationally, and the Institution of Chemical Engineers (IChemE), internationally, to Master Level Meng (Level 9). To date, this programme has provided in excess of 750 graduates, the majority of whom work in Ireland, in the biopharmaceutical/pharmaceutical industry with many having risen to senior appointments.

In this seminar, our colleagues from the Department of Process Energy and Transport Engineering gave an overview of how their industrial work placement module, worth 15 ECTS credits, which runs from the end of the third academic year to the end of the first semester of the award year, evolved and how it can enhance engineering competencies and therefore have a significant impact on the career paths of their graduating engineers. They shared best practise based on their research, carried out with the assistance of CIT’s AnSEO – The Student Engagement Office, and experience for the delivery of the professional work placement from execution, mentoring and assessment of same.

Those attending this seminar gained a clear understanding of:

• How the delivery of industrial hosted modules within engineering third level institutes can be improved

• How an enhanced experiential learning experience can be created for final year students

• How key industrial partnerships can be fortified by developing “culturally fit” graduates

 

View Resources

Monday,

6th January 2020

Engaging Students in Deep Learning by Crowdsourcing Quality Questions

 

Presented By

  • Dr Anna Dynan, Lecturer, Accounting & Information Systems

Description

Deep Learning refers to the cognitive skills and academic knowledge that students need to succeed in the 21st century. These skills include critical thinking, problem solving, communication, collaboration and learning to learn. The mastery of these skills will enable students to think flexibly and creatively, transferring and applying their learning from one context to new situations.

This seminar looked at how one academic in CIT, Dr Anna Dynan, Accounting & Information Systems has used PeerWise, a free online platform, to provide a space where her students can collaboratively create, answer, discuss, and evaluate practice questions with peers and has thereby helped her students engage with unit concepts more deeply and critically.

In this seminar, participants gained an understanding of:

  • How PeerWise can be used to engage students and enhance their learning outcomes.
  • The impact this approach can have on student engagement and learning
  • The student view on this collaborative approach to learning
  • Advice/best practice/tip & tricks when using PeerWise in your module.

View Resources

Tuesday,

7th January 2020

Developing Data-Enabled Student Success Strategies: What can we do with the data we collect to enhance student success?

A Workshop Sponsored by Dr Barry O’Connor, President, CIT

 

Presented By

  • Lee O'Farrell, Student Success Project Manager, National Forum for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

Description

This workshop, offered as part of the National Forum's Data-Enabled Student Success Initiative (DESSI), was structured to explore key themes around developing institutional strategies that maximise the value of learner and institutional data.

This workshop was of interest to many including lecturing, student services, access, quality and policy staff as well as senior management, IT Services, Library, TEL etc. It was a highly collaborative event, facilitated by the DESSI National Coordinator, and gave a wide range of voices in the institution the opportunity to collaboratively explore some of the considerations that are critical for an effective, sustainable, strategic approach to using the data we collect to enhance student success.

These included:

  1. What is our objective?
  2. What are our defining principles?
  3. What question(s) do we want to answer with the data?
  4. What are we going to DO once we have answered the question (e.g. how are we going to meaningfully intervene?)
  5. What steps do we need to take to get the ball rolling (i.e. what are the actions arising from the workshop?)

View Resources

Tuesday,

7th January 2020

CIT Learning Communities (LCs): Support & Development Session for Existing or Potential LCs

 

Facilitated By

  • Prof Jim O’Mahony, Biological Sciences & TLU

Description

CIT’s Teaching & Learning Unit (TLU) launched an inaugural call in 2018 to develop and support a number of Learning Communities (LCs) across the institute and is currently working with 13 emerging LCs from across the institute as a direct result of this call.

LCs facilitate the exchange of good teaching and learning ideas amongst its members and provide a platform for professional discussions and sharing of practices.

The main purpose of this session was to support our current cohort of (LCs) but was also useful to those who would like to learn more about the benefits of initiating and sustaining an active LC.

 

View Resources

Wednesday,

8th January 2020

How Good Conflict Can Develop Creative Learning Communities:

A Seminar Funded by the National Forum for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

 

Presented By

  • Ms. Shelley Crawford, European Mentoring and Coaching Council
  • Mr. Ruairí Ó Ceilleachair, EDelia Coaching and TLU, CIT

Description

The value of Learning Communities, especially those that work across disciplines, is that they facilitate a sharing of expertise, knowledge and experience. Accessing ‘the wisdom in the room’ is often cited as the purpose of sharing in such communities. The word ‘dialogue’ in its original Greek form represents a process where new wisdom and insight is reached between two people which could not have been reached by either party on their own. Such a process inevitably involves the reconciling, fusing or synthesis of two or more, often conflicting, ideas or viewpoints often in an effort to clarify and articulate a common goal for the group.

This seminar explored the need, nature, cause and value of conflict in the synthesis of new ideas, knowledge and learning. Participants interrogated the effectiveness of one of the most popular tools for understanding and dealing with conflict i.e. the Thomas Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument.

In workshop format, participants explored their own preferred approach to conflict and used the Kilmann model to experiment with alternative approaches to conflict in order to promote meaningful dialogue in learning communities. Teaching and Learning Practice can be enhanced when people learn to better engage with colleagues, who have conflicting viewpoints, in a way that allows for all voices to be heard and that cultivates the positive restlessness which leads to new insights, consensus and action.

On completion of this seminar participants had:

  • Gained an understanding of the nature and importance of conflict in developing creative learning communities
  • Became familiar with the Thomas Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument
  • Became more aware of their own preferred approach mode
  • Had explored and practiced alternative conflict modes with peers

View Resources

Thursday,

9th January 2020

Mission Critical: Using ‘critical moments’, not ‘at risk’ students to flip our view of student success using Transitions Pedagogy

A Seminar Funded by the National Forum for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

 

Presented By

  • Dr Diane Nutt, Higher Education Consultant, European First Year Experience Network
  • William Carey,TLU, CIT

Description

To understand what impedes student success, it has been common to consider the support provided to students ‘at-risk’, but what if we consider the idea of ‘critical moments’ instead?

By identifying key critical moments that students encounter, we can design curricula and student support which can increase student retention and success. Therefore, we are more likely to reach a greater number of students while carrying out activities in a more cost-effective way. This is particularly the case where institutions have high numbers of widening access students, who are recognised as more vulnerable to dropping out or failing. First generation students may encounter more critical moments (family responsibilities, financial challenges, discrimination in some aspect of their experience, etc), and have less resources in place to pass through them successfully (family who have been to university, financial resources, confidence, social networks etc),

This workshop drew facilitators with a European perspective and encouraged participants to think about and begin to understand the critical moments their students face in a discipline and wider student experience context. Time was spent identifying local critical moments, contrasting with known experiences across Europe and introducing the model of Transitions Pedagogy to consider practical approaches to reduce and support identified critical moments.

The use of Transitions Pedagogy will help ensure any approaches are grounded in discipline context and curriculum planning. It is therefore a seminar that had particular relevance to all those who teach and those who support/manage teachers.

Participants attending this seminar:

  • Gained an understanding and explored the concept of ‘critical moments’ for students across the lifecycle in their institution
  • Reflected on how their institution’s knowledge and support of critical moments contrasts across European Higher Education (HE) settings
  • Were introduced to the Transitions Pedagogy model to consider critical moments in the holistic design of curricula as well as student support
  • Identified and planned the practical/impactful methods/approaches that can reduce unnecessary critical moments and support students in those moments intrinsic to their HE journey.

View Resources

Friday,

10th January 2020

REQUIRED - Research Ethics in QUestionnaIRE Design

 

Presented By

  • Dr Helen Purtill, Lecturer in Statistics in the Department of Mathematics & Statistics, University of Limerick
  • Prof Ger Kelly, Research Integrity Officer and Head, Department Mechanical, Biomedical & Manufacturing Engineering, Cork Institute of Technology
  • John Dunne, Senior Statistician, Central Statistics Office

Description

There is a prevalence of survey usage across third level Institutes. Surveys are sometimes regarded as an easy approach to obtaining opinions and measurements. However, it is easy to conduct a survey of poor quality rather than one of high quality and real value. This seminar will provide a checklist of good practice in the conduct and reporting of survey research. Its purpose is to assist the participants to produce survey work to a high standard, meaning a standard at which the results will be regarded as credible.

The seminar will first provide an overview of the approach to questionnaire design and then guide the participants step-by-step through the processes of data collection, data analysis, and storage. The seminar is not intended to provide a manual of how to conduct a survey, but rather to identify common pitfalls and oversights to be avoided by researchers if their work is to be valid and credible.

Anyone involved in collecting data from subjects has an ethical duty to respect each individual participant’s autonomy. All surveys should be conducted in an ethical manner and one that accords with best practice. Confidentiality with regard to all participant information should always be respected, with due care given in both the collection, recording, storage and destruction of data. The seminar will highlight the importance and role of ethics, research integrity and data storage in questionnaire design.

This seminar was particularly relevant to academic staff, i.e. lecturers, supervisors and researchers, but was also relevant to professional management support staff.

Participants attending this seminar gained insights into:

  • The steps involved in designing a reliable questionnaire such as qualities of good questions, questionnaire length, question wording, order of questions, etc.
  • The importance of a Statistical Analysis Plan (SAP) in questionnaire design.
  • How meeting ethical standards ensures researchers act in good faith and protects the integrity of the resulting data.
  • Processes to help us to be aware of, respect and protect the personal data collected.

 

View

If you have any questions about any of the above seminars or workshops, please email TLU_team@cit.ie.

Let's get social