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The National Seminar Series, sponsored by the National Forum for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, gives those working in higher education the opportunity to connect with colleagues and to focus on shared interests in both the research and practice of teaching and learning enhancement. The series also creates opportunities to hear from national and international experts in different areas of teaching and learning.

Over the last number of years The Teaching and Learning Unit has hosted a number of national seminars, details of which you can find below.

Conversations on Teaching & Learning Seminar Series,

Monday, 15th May 2017

Developing Assessment Literacy in Students – Intentional Interventions: A Seminar Funded by the National Forum for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning

Presenter:

  • Prof Margaret Price, Professor Emerita of Assessment and Learning, Oxford Brookes University

The power of assessment and feedback within the learning process has been recognised for many years and yet the paradigms that currently frame assessment leave students in a passive role and still largely focus on accreditation. This situation needs to be challenged through the development of assessment literacy of both staff and students which, in turn will make new approaches to assessment and feedback possible.

This seminar discussed the nature of assessment literacy, why it is important, how it has the potential to reshape our thinking about assessment and feedback and how it supports the development of student learning. Participants were invited to take part in activities designed to allow them to share their expertise, review their practices and take away new ideas.

The aim of the seminar was to:

  • Explain the concept of assessment literacy
  • Describe the contribution assessment literacy can make to supporting student learning
  • Identify key initiatives that support the development of assessment literacy

View resources

Conversations on Teaching & Learning Seminar Series,

Thursday, 11th January 2018

Building Capacity through Professional Development:

A Seminar Funded by the National Forum for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

Presented By:

  • Professor Sally Brown, Emerita Professor of Higher Education Diversity in Teaching and Learning at Leeds Metropolitan University, Visiting Professor at University of Plymouth, Adjunct Professor at University of the Sunshine Coast, and James Cook University

The seminar consisted of two components – presentations and a collaborative workshop.

Presentations focused on some key theoretical perspectives and were delivered by Professor Sally Brown and drew on her rich experience in this area as well as ideas from the text she has recently co-authored with Kay Sambell and Linda Graham – Professionalism in Practice. The presentation considered aspects such as drivers for change in higher education and outlined the impact that the professional development framework has had in the UK and the increasingly professionalised nature of higher education in the UK. Change management and the role that Heads of Department and Heads of Schools have in leading change within their disciplines were explored as well as the processes that are available to encourage all staff to engage in professional development – especially in the context of educational development as opposed to developing disciplinary-specific knowledge and skills.

In the workshop, participants explored the Irish National Professional Development Framework and identified the likely opportunities that would arise from staff engaging with this Framework as well as the challenges and barriers they are likely to face. The workshop concluded by exploring ways in which the opportunities can be maximised and barriers minimised.

The aim of this seminar and the accompanying workshop, was to ensure participants:

  • Understand the drivers for change in higher education, the professionalisation of the higher education sector, and in the context of the UK experience, the benefits arising from engaging with a national professional development framework
  • Have an appreciation of the opportunities afforded by the Professional Development Framework to both themselves and the staff within their departments as well as the barriers to engaging with it.
  • Understand the role of Heads of Departments and Heads of School in leading change within their disciplines
  • Learn about ways of engaging staff in their own professional development

View Resources

Conversations on Teaching & Learning Seminar Series,

Wednesday, 16th May 2018

Exploring Approaches to Work Based Assessment:

A Seminar Funded by the National Forum for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning

Presented By:

  • Dr Jon Talbot, Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor), Centre for Work Related Studies, University of Chester
  • Prof Irene Sheridan, Head Extended Campus, CIT 

This seminar considered key theoretical perspectives on work-based assessment.

It discussed:

  • The nature of work-based learning and its role in:
    • Developing key graduate skills
    • The wider life-long learning society.
  • Different approaches to work-based learning practice, including the new apprenticeship model.
  • The context of learning, including the role and responsibilities of both the learner and the employer, with a focus on authentic assessment approaches that support individualised learning.

Participants were encouraged to bring along module descriptors, related to learning in the workplace, so that these theoretical perspectives could be applied to practice.

In the workshop component, participants, in small groups, discussed, critiqued and developed the methods and processes that they currently use to assess placements in their own disciplines. They were encouraged to examine the ways in which current theory and best practice could inform and develop their disciplinary approaches.

View Resources

Conversations on Teaching & Learning Seminar Series,

Tuesday, 8th January 2019

Effectively supporting study transitions to improve student engagement, wellbeing, progression, attainment and success:

A Seminar Funded by the National Forum for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning

Presented By:

  • Dr Michelle Morgan, Associate Professor & Associate Dean of the Student Experience, Faculty of Media and Communications, Bournemouth University.

Supporting and enhancing the undergraduate and postgraduate student experience throughout the student lifecycle is a critical activity in higher education not only to aid retention and progression but in a highly competitive higher education (HE) market, the quality of the student experience is pivotal in HE institution’s attracting students.

In recent years, research and initiatives have tended to focus on the first-year student experience (i.e. those entering year one of a course with subsequent years being neglected), or learning and teaching, and assessment and feedback. However, although the first year is crucial in helping to embed students into their studies, it is essential to support students in a joined-up approach across academic and non-academic spheres in, through and out of the study journey to aid student engagement, wellbeing, progression, attainment and success.

This seminar looked at the key transitions in the study journey and focused on and suggested ways that institutions can create excellence in their delivery of a high-quality student experience from raising aspirations to entry preparation and throughout each level of study.

Participants who attended this seminar:

  1. Examined the student lifecycle, identified key transition points and their associated challenges
  2. Explored possibilities for enhancing student engagement and better preparing students at each stage from first year induction to ‘outduction’
  3. Were introduced to and explored the ‘Student Experience Transitions Model’ that interlinks the key activities of academic, welfare and support. The model provides a framework for colleagues to organise and map out the various types of support required for different students at particular times throughout their journey at university or college
  4. Shared practice with colleagues from other institutions and make connections for collaborative projects
  5. Had a facilitated discussion on how student engagement might be best enhanced at different stages from Pre-entry to Post-graduation.

View Resources

Conversations on Teaching & Learning Seminar Series,

Thursday, 10th January 2019

Peer Mentoring in Higher Education – a key to better staff induction:

A Seminar Funded by the National Forum for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning

Presented By:

  • Ms. Shelley Crawford, European Mentoring and Coaching Council
  • Mr. Ruairí Ó Ceilleachair, Edelia Coaching and TLU, CIT

Peer coaching is a staff development model which can be used to develop and try new strategies and determine what does and does not work by critically evaluating beliefs about teaching and learning. Peer coaching is built upon trusting relationships that develop between lecturers.

The seminar outlined the nature of a coaching conversation and gave participants an opportunity to develop their listening, questioning and feedback skills. The seminar was designed to develop professional communication and dialogue one of the four domains underpinned by the National Professional Development framework’s values.

Collegial coaching, technical coaching, challenge coaching and team coaching were examined and their use in third level explored. The four types of peer coaching are all very different, but they are built upon effective communication that is honest and open and based on an unbiased attitude and a willingness to help others grow professionally. This involves trust building. Effective peer coaches must be dedicated to working in a trusting relationship with a partner to continually improve his or her teaching skills. They must also be open to new ideas and willingly share classroom experiences with their partners. Effective communication means more than just teachers talking with each other. It involves:

  • conversation skills
  • listening skills
  • nonverbal language
  • giving constructive feedback
  • developing trusting relationships

The seminar/workshop employed a blended learning approach involving experiential learning techniques complimented by facilitated debriefs, group discussions and short presentations.

Participants who attended this workshop:

  1. Deepened their understanding of the nature and benefits of peer coaching in enhancing CPD commitment and impact.
  2. Gained a heightened awareness of their capacity to listen with unconditional positive regard
  3. Increased their knowledge and expertise in the use of questioning to raise awareness
  4. Developed their skills in offering impactful feedback
  5. Constructed an action plan to utilise the workshop content to improve their own communication skills so they can better support their peers and engage in purposeful conversations regarding professional development, development of learning communities and communities of practice.

View Resources

Conversations on Teaching & Learning Seminar Series,

Tuesday, 14th May 2019

Digi-teach: Digital Teaching Tools for Mathematics in Higher Education:

A Seminar Funded by the National Forum for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

Presented By:

  • Cork Institute of Technology
  • Griffith College Cork

Cork Institute of Technology and Griffith College Cork came together to organise this seminar to examine digital teaching tools for Mathematics in Higher Education. The focus of this seminar was to explore and champion effective digital tools and technologies in the teaching of Mathematics in Higher Education in Ireland and to create an opportunity for networking and initiation of collaborative relationships in this area. It provided hands on experience of educational technology in Mathematics for participants and provided a forum for exploring challenges, exchanging ideas and disseminating practices.

Talks/workshops included:

  • Dr Maria Meehan, UCD, who discussed her experience of the use of technology in teaching Mathematics.
  • CIT’s Technology Enhanced Learning Department who discussed Teaching Mathematics using virtual and augmented reality.
  • Lightning Talks from participants who use education technology in their Higher Education Maths classroom/lecture who shared their experience with others
  • Parallel Workshops on Mathematics e-assessment using Numbas catering for beginners and more advanced users.

View Resources

Conversations on Teaching & Learning Seminar Series,

Thursday, 16th May 2019

Developing Peer Mentoring Skills to enhance CPD in Teaching and Learning and better enable Learning Communities:

A Seminar Funded by the National Forum for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

Presented By:

  • Ms Shelley Crawford, European Mentoring and Coaching Council
  • Mr Ruairí Ó Ceilleachair, Edelia Coaching and TLU, CIT
  • Dr Brigid Lucey, Biological Sciences, CIT

Vygotsky’s (1978) theory of social constructivism highlighted the importance of the contribution of others to every individual’s learning. With the increasing use of ICT and the internet, learning communities can expand beyond geographical limitations leading to new and exciting educational dimensions and learning opportunities across schools, colleges, communities and cultures. The term ‘learning community’ has become increasingly common in education usage and can mean many different things, from bringing members of the local community into the college to collaborative learning among students or lecturers.

Colleges today are complex, interwoven, interactive environments where learning flourishes when there is a spirit of openness and transparency and where lecturers are more likely to adopt a collegial approach incorporating shared leadership and authority thereby facilitating the work of the students. In colleges that are learning communities, everyone is a learner, and everyone is a teacher.

This seminar explored how a coaching skill set can be used to enable learning institutions to develop the skills of enquiry, collaboration, sharing of practice and critically evaluate beliefs about teaching and learning.

The overall aim of the seminar was to enhance the quality of professional communication and dialogue one of the four domains underpinned by the National Professional Development framework’s values. The seminar employed a blended learning approach involving experiential learning techniques complimented by facilitated debriefs, group discussions and short presentations.

The main objectives of this seminar were that participants would have:

  • Deepened their understanding of the nature and benefits of peer coaching.
  • Gained a heightened awareness of how coaching skills can be used to enhance individual and group learning.
  • Gained insight into how a departmental wide peer mentoring model is evolving in CIT.
  • Increased their knowledge and expertise in the use of coaching skills in their professional roles.
  • Have practiced their coaching skills in challenging situations.
  • Constructed an action plan to utilise the workshop content to improve their peer coaching skills so they can better support their peers and engage in purposeful conversations regarding professional development, development of learning communities and communities of practice.

View Resources

Conversations on Teaching & Learning Seminar Series,

Friday, 17th May 2019

Realigning Teaching, Learning and Assessment: Integrating Assessment for Learning in Challenging Times:

A Seminar Funded by the National Forum for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

Presented By:

  • Dr Zita Lysaght, School of Policy and Practice at the Institute of Education (St. Patrick's Campus), DCU

This aim of this seminar was to promote informed thinking about how assessment is conceived and practiced at third level with a view to greater alignment between teaching, learning and assessment. It allowed lecturers and academic managers to discuss and share good practice while also considering how current assessment procedures in place in their institutions might be enhanced to improve student learning, progression and success.

Assessment for learning is one of the most powerful ways of improving student learning and achievement. Formative assessment, done well, improves student self-regulation and awareness of what needs to be done to enhance their learning, is forward focused and motivational. Participants considered how enhancing learning, teaching and assessment alignment can improve learning for different student cohorts and group sizes in times of limited resources and increasing accountability.

The workshop element of the seminar gave participants the opportunity to share and take away some practical ideas and techniques that they could use in their classes.

Participants in this seminar:

  • Reflected upon the relationship between teaching, learning and assessment for learning
  • Considered the challenges of effective management of assessment from an institutional, teacher/lecturer and student perspective
  • Reflected on how assessment design, integration with the curriculum, marking and feedback could best be supported
  • Discussed, shared good practice and considered current assessment procedures and how they might be enhanced with different student cohorts/group sizes
  • Considered some practical/ impactful assessment for learning techniques that they may like to use in the future

View Resources

Conversations on Teaching & Learning Seminar Series,

Wednesday, 8th January 2020

How Good Conflict Can Develop Creative Learning Communities:

A Seminar Funded by the National Forum for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

Presented By

  • Ms. Shelley Crawford, European Mentoring and Coaching Council
  • Mr. Ruairí Ó Ceilleachair, EDelia Coaching and TLU, CIT

Description

The value of Learning Communities, especially those that work across disciplines, is that they facilitate a sharing of expertise, knowledge and experience. Accessing ‘the wisdom in the room’ is often cited as the purpose of sharing in such communities. The word ‘dialogue’ in its original Greek form represents a process where new wisdom and insight is reached between two people which could not have been reached by either party on their own. Such a process inevitably involves the reconciling, fusing or synthesis of two or more, often conflicting, ideas or viewpoints often in an effort to clarify and articulate a common goal for the group.

This seminar explored the need, nature, cause and value of conflict in the synthesis of new ideas, knowledge and learning. Participants interrogated the effectiveness of one of the most popular tools for understanding and dealing with conflict i.e. the Thomas Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument.

In workshop format, participants explored their own preferred approach to conflict and used the Kilmann model to experiment with alternative approaches to conflict in order to promote meaningful dialogue in learning communities. Teaching and Learning Practice can be enhanced when people learn to better engage with colleagues, who have conflicting viewpoints, in a way that allows for all voices to be heard and that cultivates the positive restlessness which leads to new insights, consensus and action.

On completion of this seminar participants had:

  • Gained an understanding of the nature and importance of conflict in developing creative learning communities
  • Became familiar with the Thomas Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument
  • Became more aware of their own preferred approach mode
  • Had explored and practiced alternative conflict modes with peers

View Resources

Tús Maith Seminar Series, Tuesday,

15th September 2020

Universal Design for Learning: Accessibility & Inclusive Assessment and Feedback

A Seminar Funded by the National Forum for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

Facilitated By:

  • Dr Lisa Padden, Project Lead - University for All, UCD
  • Trevor Boland, Digital Media and eLearning Officer, AHEAD (Ireland)

Seminar Description:

Universal Design for Learning (UDL) aims to eliminate barriers in the design of the learning environment to make the curriculum accessible for all. COVID-19 has, if anything, highlighted the need for higher and further education providers to fully embrace UDL principles and practice so as to ensure high-quality education for all students and allow for full active participation by all learners.

This session outlined the principles of UDL, examined what these principles look like in action and provided advice on how these principles can be applied, even when at distance or online. In addition, it demonstrated how, with the correct mindset at the creation stage, we can ensure resources created for students are accessible and how students can be offered flexibility through engagement, representation, action and expression. To conclude, the core tenets of inclusive assessment and feedback practice were outlined, and how this practice can be developed at programme and individual level was demonstrated. Drawing on research from the National Forum, UDL and practical case studies as examples, specific assessment methodologies will be examined and consideration will be given as to how these might be transformed, through the lens of universal design, to ensure inclusion of the full student population.

Participants in this session learned about:

  • Accessible resource creation, be it in hard copy or electronic format.
  • format.
  • How to redesign their own assessment strategies, either through simple tweaks or fundamental changes to ensure all students have the opportunity to demonstrate their learning.

View Recording

Resources

Thinking about Assessment Seminar Series, 

Friday, 30th October 2020

Plagiarism and Collusion – Myth or Reality? Assessment for Future Needs:

A Seminar Funded by the National Forum for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

Presented By:

  • Associate Professor Phillip Dawson, Associate Director, Centre for Research in Assessment and Digital Learning (CRADLE)

Seminar Description:

This seminar explored concerns around academic integrity in Higher Education and how assessment redesign can eliminate many of these concerns.

The seminar was divided into two elements. The first session explored why, how and when students cheat in Higher Education. It opened up discussion and debate on academic integrity, plagiarism, collusion and contract cheating and the role we play in it as educators. 

The second part of the seminar focused on re-thinking how we assess and redesigning assessment approaches. The presenter discussed strategies that include encouraging students to see assessment, both, as an opportunity to learn and an opportunity to demonstrate their excellence and skills. Redesigning and rethinking the tasks we ask our students to complete in order to demonstrate attainment of the desired life-long skills in tandem with module and programme learning outcomes can effectively eliminate both the desire and the opportunity to ‘cheat’.

Across the two sessions participants were asked to self-reflect, to consider their values and establish why they assess as they do. Traditions and assumptions were challenged & participants were supported in the redesigning of assessment approaches.

View Recording

Slide Decks

  1. Cheating, Assessment Design and Assessment Security
  2. Designing Assessment with the Assessment Design Decisions Framework

Additional Resources

Thinking about Assessment Seminar Series,

Friday, 6th November 2020

Redesigning Assessment and Developing Staff and Student Feedback Literacy:

A Seminar Funded by the National Forum for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

Presented By:

  • Dr Naomi Winstone, Director of the Surrey Institute of Education, University of Surrey
  • Prof David Carless, Professor of Educational Assessment, Faculty of Education, University of Hong Kong

Seminar Description

This seminar focused on developing feedback literacy in both staff and students and redesigning assessment to build on this new-found understanding. It drew on student and staff expertise across two main strands.

Strand 1 took a ‘deep dive’ to explore what learner-focused feedback means and how staff and students can enable impacts from different feedback approaches. Particular emphasis was placed on feedback literacy: the capacities of teachers and students to make the most of feedback opportunities. What capabilities do teachers and students need in order to take up their complementary roles in feedback processes?

Strand 2 looked at disentangling assessment and feedback and explored the various forms of feedback used in assessment and in the absence of assessment. Assessment design was highlighted so that opportunities to provide feedback to inform future work are intentionally embedded at the development phase.

View Recording

Slide Decks

  1. Prof David Carless - Developing Staff and Student Feedback Literacy
  2. Dr Naomi Winstone - Designing feedback opportunities

Additional Resource

Chat file from Redesigning Assessment and Developing Staff and Student Feedback Literacy which contains links to lots of useful resources.

Thinking about Assessment Seminar Series,

Thursday, 12th November 2020

Working on Reflection - Supporting Students to Reflect on Work Placement

A Seminar Funded by the National Forum for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

Presented By:

  • Dr Jenny Moon, Visiting Fellow, Centre for Excellence in Media Practice, Bournemouth University

Seminar Description

Reflective practice is a key skill in many professions including education. but is particularly relevant to students in the context of work placement. We as educators expect students embarking on work placement to have, at some point in their studies, developed sufficient reflection skills to enable them effectively capture their learning from the placement experience. However, this is not always the case as students often receive little explicit instruction, practice or guidance about how to reflect.

In this seminar participants were guided through the process of reflection and themselves engaged in reflective practices. There were opportunities for discussion in breakout rooms.  Discussions covered how other colleagues are engaging students on reflection in placement settings.

View Recording

Workshop Materials

  1. Slide Deck
  2. Notes accompanying slides plus graduated scenarios exercises

Additional Resource

Conversations on Teaching & Learning Seminar Series,

Thursday, 14th January 2021

Relational Pedagogy and Whole-class Engagement – Can it Really be Done?!

A Seminar Funded by the National Forum for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

Presented By:

  • Dr Catherine Bovill, Senior Lecturer in Student Engagement, Institute for Academic Development, University of Edinburgh

Seminar Description

“When the first day of class comes around, you’ve reflected on your course goals and structure, gathered your syllabus together, shared materials in Canvas, and prepared your first day of class presentation. How do you then establish a relationship with your students? How do you talk with them on the first day? How do you set the tone?” (Cathy Bovill, January 2020, Georgetown University)

Drawing on her most recent work, ‘Co-creating Learning and Teaching: Towards relational pedagogy in higher education’ (April 2020), Cathy Bovill explores the concept of relational pedagogy using the classroom as a focus for curriculum co-creation.

We can often think that co-creation might only be available to small groups of students working closely with a member of staff, as might also be suggested of many student partnership activities. However, this seminar challenges this idea and explores how co-creation has the potential in both classroom and online class teaching settings to include all students in developing relationships and shared decision making. The seminar suggests that in the pivot to online delivery these opportunities should be maximised.

Using her current research and time as a Fulbright Scholar (based at Elon University), Cathy shares examples from university and school settings, to set the challenge to participants to identify ways in which their presence in the classroom (online or otherwise) might be used to positively shape their learning and teaching practice in a way that demonstrates a care for their students thus building a more positive student learning experience.

This seminar enabled participants to:

  • Understand and explore the concept of relational pedagogy in a face-to-face and online environment
  • Reflect on how their own experience in ‘whole-class’ engagement practices contribute to an engaged learning environment
  • Consider how their own understandings and definitions of student engagement, partnership and co-creation impact their professional practice
  • Identify and plan the practical/impactful methods/approaches that could be implemented in learning environments to support a whole-class resulting in a more inclusive experience for all students.

View Recording

View Resources

Conversations on Teaching & Learning Seminar Series,

Tuesday, 11th January 2022

Plotting your UDL Journey: getting started and moving forward

A Seminar Funded by the National Forum for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

Presented by

  • Prof Jo Rushworth, Senior Lecturer in Biochemistry (De Montfort University), Associate Professor of Teaching and Learning and National Teaching Fellow
  • Dr Amanda Bastoni, Educational Research Scientist, CAST

Seminar Description

In this online seminar, we were joined by Prof Jo Rushworth, National Teaching Fellow and Senior Lecturer in Biochemistry in the School of Allied Health Sciences, De Montfort University, and by Dr Amanda Bastoni, Educational Research Scientist at CAST. (https://www.cast.org/)

Prof Jo Rushworth drew on her experience as a UDL champion for her School as she outlined a range of options and starting points for colleagues who are starting out on their Universal Design journey. This work focussed on providing students with flexible learning resources, flexible ways to engage with their learning and flexible ways to demonstrate knowledge and skills, that impacted both learning and teaching and institutional policy. In an interactive presentation, Jo told us about how the UDL guidelines were brought to life and implemented across DMU and led us in a discussion of early steps toward achieving UDL compliance in teaching practice and of options for continuing development and enhancement. Jo’s work on co-creation with students was among the highlights from her case study. 

Expanding on some key themes from Jo’s presentation, Dr Amanda Bastoni’s workshop introduced the concept of co-design and (using the UDL framework) highlighted how educators can increase creativity, collaboration, and learning in their classroom by designing learning with their students. In the workshop, we covered the why and how of co-design, including stories from the field, resources, and strategies educators can use immediately - in any learning environment.

Those who participated in this seminar learned how to:

  • Apply early steps, approaches and strategies to confidently initiate inclusive practice in their student interactions
  • Build upon these early steps iteratively over time, moving toward excellent inclusive practice
  • Approach classroom co-creation with students using UDL as a framework
  • Leverage the UDL framework and the process of co-creation to increase creativity, collaboration, and learning in their classrooms

Organised by:

  • Dr Marian Hurley, AnSEO – The Student Engagement Office, MTU Cork
  • Linda O’Sullivan, AnSEO – The Student Engagement Office & TLU, MTU Cork
  • Ruth Murphy, Disability Support Service, MTU Cork
  • Thomas Broderick, Sport, Leisure & Childhood Studies, MTU Cork
  • Sheila Walsh, Marketing & International Business, MTU Cork

View Part 1: UDL-ifying a university and its people

View Part 2: Universal Design for Learning Co-Designing Your Classroom

Link to Prof Rushworth's Padlet

View Resources

Conversations on Teaching & Learning Seminar Series,

Wednesday, 12th January 2022

Developing an Ethos of Authentic Assessment

A Seminar Funded by the National Forum for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

Presented By:

  • Dr Pio Fenton, Head, Marketing & International Business, MTU Cork
  • Michele McManus, Lecturer, Marketing & International Business, MTU Cork
  • Conor Kelleher, Lecturer, Marketing & International Business, MTU Cork
  • Elaine O’Brien, Lecturer, Marketing & International Business, MTU Cork

Seminar Description

Authentic assessment is a means of providing assessment opportunities which are like tasks in the ‘real world’. Students are asked to thoughtfully apply their acquired skills to a new situation or environment. Assessments are considered authentic if they are realistic, require judgement and innovation and assess students’ ability to effectively use their knowledge or skills to complete a task.

This seminar presented the experiences from the Marketing discipline at Munster Technological University in developing a comprehensive approach to the use of authentic assessment as a means of fostering student engagement and developing collaboration with businesses.  Adopting the perspective of a "work in progress" the presentation challenged participants around the ongoing reliance on terminal examination and similar mechanisms, while also reflecting the realities of delivering complicated assessment mechanisms with large-sized student groups.

Those who participated in this seminar:

  • Learned about the role of authentic assessment in fast-moving disciplines
  • Developed understanding around the systemic supports required institutionally to support authentic assessment
  • Heard the student voice in design and deployment of authentic assessment

View Recording

View Resources

National Seminar Series 2021/22,

Wed 16 Feb 2022

Coaching and coaching approaches in higher education settings

A Seminar Funded by the National Forum for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

Presented By:

  • Prof. Christian van Nieuwerburgh, Global Director of Growth Coaching International & Professor of Coaching & Positive Psychology, Centre for Positive Psychology and Health, RCSI

Seminar Description

Coaching is about creating the right environment so that people can think, grow, and develop for themselves (van Nieuwerburgh, 2020). In the Higher Education context, the potential of coaching to enhance student success and wellbeing is currently being uncovered (van Nieuwerburgh, 2020). As such, the visibility and prominence of coaching in Higher Education contexts is increasing and this coincides with significant momentum in the development and application not only of coaching programmes, but in the application of coaching approaches and positive psychology in educational settings.

This seminar will provide participants with an opportunity to hear from a thought leader in the area of coaching in educational settings and to discuss coaching as it is can be applied in their own contexts. Through it, attendees will gain insights into how coaching can contribute to student success through the structured development of learner agency and self-efficacy.

Christian will share his experience of applying coaching in educational settings across a number of countries and will introduce a Global Framework for Coaching in Education, developed alongside colleagues Jim Knight and John Campbell. The model centres students’ success and wellbeing through a range of activities aligned to themes such as Student Experience, Educational Leaderships, Community Engagement and Professional Practice.

Those who participate in this seminar will gain an understanding of:

  • How coaching is being and can be applied in higher education settings.
  • How coaching approaches can be applied to promote student success.
  • How coaching and mentoring can be leveraged to enhance HE learning environments for students.

View Recoding

View Resources

 

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